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ReefNewb

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Cyano. A type of algae that is common to new tanks, and old ones with issues too. You can direct some flow towards it(it doesn't like a lot of flow), siphon it out, and/or just let the tank run it's course. It should go away in time.

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I've battled cyano even with good flow and high dKH.

You have excess nutrients (phosphates) in your water column. Cut-back on feedings, run some GFO, and try a "3 days of darkness" period.

However, I didn't truly eliminate my cyano until I vacuumed out most of my sandbed. Your sandbed looks pretty thick....how old is it?

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I've battled cyano even with good flow and high dKH.

You have excess nutrients (phosphates) in your water column. Cut-back on feedings, run some GFO, and try a "3 days of darkness" period.

However, I didn't truly eliminate my cyano until I vacuumed out most of my sandbed. Your sandbed look pretty thick....how old is it?

The three days of darkness usually works. I intensify the effect by wrapping the tank in beach towels for the 3 days. Make the tank as dark as possible for 72 hours. Your fish and inverts will get along fine not being fed for 3 days.

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I have used Red Slime Algae Control by Blue Vet on every tank I ever had running...even my seahorses...NEVER a problem. I have no patience so I need immediate relief!!

I've tried the chemicals and they do indeed work (almost immediately). Unfortunately, they're just a band-aid. The source (excess nutrients) remains and if left unchecked, the cyano will eventually return.

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pbnj- sand bed is about 2 inches and a little more in some spots.

Daj- Whats a cuc? lol

I usually feed some flake in the morningand at night before i shut out the lights. that to much? just hve two damsels and a dragon goby.the rest are inverts.

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I don't like to ever use chemicals if I can avoid it. I learned a long time ago that patience almost always works. No offense mama :snack:

Test your water and make small adjustments. I sometimes will stir it up and pull it by hand if it gets thick enough.

Three days of darkness is also a bandaid. It is better suited to cutting back on photosynthetic (green) algaes.

Ultimatly you have to find the cause. As previously stated, usually to many nutrients.

Good luck.

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+1 3 days of darkness is a band-aid.

It is not treating the cause, only a symptom.

You must eliminate the cause. Water changes, less feedings, quality skimmer, etc... will help eliminate the cause.

3 days of darkness can do more harm than good. I've mentioned it before, and it is only simple to see this. When you are done with your 3 hours/3 days/3 weeks/3 months, whatever schtick you want to call it, your tank will have 2 sets of excess nutrients. Whatever was in your tank before is still in the tank as well as all this new dead stuff. You must plan to do a very large, almost extreme, water change the day you turn the lights on. Otherwise your problem will just come right back, possibly even worse.

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CUC = Clean Up Crew (snails, crabs, etc).

I don't have much to add than what others have said. I have gotten rid of it using time, flow, less nutrients, and letting the tank mature.

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I don't like to ever use chemicals if I can avoid it. I learned a long time ago that patience almost always works. No offense mama :)

Test your water and make small adjustments. I sometimes will stir it up and pull it by hand if it gets thick enough.

Three days of darkness is also a bandaid. It is better suited to cutting back on photosynthetic (green) algaes.

Ultimatly you have to find the cause. As previously stated, usually to many nutrients.

Good luck.

No offense taken Dave...!!!;)

I usually have a cyano outbreak only when a new tank is started, and then it dissipates. But yes, I do use Red Slime control, use less food, lighting and increase circulation. I find that sand sifting cucumbers are the best!! Also Mexican turbos, but they always knock things over...:D

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+1 3 days of darkness is a band-aid.

It is not treating the cause, only a symptom.

You must eliminate the cause. Water changes, less feedings, quality skimmer, etc... will help eliminate the cause.

3 days of darkness can do more harm than good. I've mentioned it before, and it is only simple to see this. When you are done with your 3 hours/3 days/3 weeks/3 months, whatever schtick you want to call it, your tank will have 2 sets of excess nutrients. Whatever was in your tank before is still in the tank as well as all this new dead stuff. You must plan to do a very large, almost extreme, water change the day you turn the lights on. Otherwise your problem will just come right back, possibly even worse.

I apologize for offering my opinion. I won't let it happen again.

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What the hell?

Seriously what was that? Rjohn your reply is ridiculous. You have your way, some of us have our way. You feel your way works, you mention it. That's what a forum is about. You said to do it, you failed to mention how it works. Some of us feel that "3 days of darkness" is a total fraud AND WE HAVE BEEN VOCAL ABOUT IT IN SEVERAL THREADS, not just picking on you in this one instance. Not only did I mention that I'm against it, I gave my reasons as to why I feel it is a fraud unless you are willing to do the follow through maintenance. Your post only said to kill the lights and not feed for 3 days. You did not explain how that helps or what follow up maintenance is necessary. That is if you feel any is necessary at all.

Your first reply was just as welcome as any on the forum. It may even help some people with their problem. Some of us feel otherwise and explain why. It is up to the end user to decide which method will help. I cannot fathom why you would feel that my reply was directed at you, and not at your reply.

Don't worry if I want to slam you, I'll call you right out. I did not call you out directly within my reply, only explained why I feel it can do more harm than good. I still stand my my opinion that it is better to treat the cause. Your opinion about 1 method to attack the problem is just as valid to be displayed in this public forum as any. If you feel that my reply was directed at you as an attack, grow up old man and send me a PM.

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Can we please keep it civil (and if you cant, thats what pm's are for), all opinions (you cannot have a wrong opinion) are appreciated.

cyano can also be caused by too much carbon(compounds, not elemental) in the water, and too high Co2(another carbon source).

All red slime remover is, is an oxidizing agent.

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"Cyanobacteria: phylum of prokaryotic aguatic bacteria that obtain their energy through photosynthesis. They are often referred to as blue-green algae, even though it is now known that they are not related to any of the other algal groups, which are all eukaryotes. Cyanobacteria may be single-celled or colonial. Depending upon the species and environmental conditions, colonies may form filaments, sheets or even hollow balls. Some filamentous colonies show the ability to differentiate into three different cell types. Despite their name, different species can be red, brown, or yellow; blooms (dense masses on the surface of a body of water) of a red species are said to have given the Red Sea its name. There are two main sorts of pigmentation. Most cyanobacteria contain chlorophyll a, together with various proteins called phycobilins, which give the cells a typical blue-green to grayish-brown colour. A few genera, however, lack phycobilins and have chlorophyll b as well as a, giving them a bright green colour.

Unlike bacteria, which are heterotrophic decomposers of the wastes and bodies of other organisms, cyanobacteria contain the green pigment chlorophyll (as well as other pigments), which traps the energy of sunlight and enables these organisms to carry on photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria are thus autotrophic producers of their own food from simple raw materials. Nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria need only nitrogen and carbon dioxide to live: they are able to fix nitrogen gas, which cannot be absorbed by plants, into ammonia (NH3), nitrites (NO2) or nitrates (NO3), which can be absorbed by plants and converted to protein and nucleic acids.

Cyanobacteria are found in almost every conceivable habitat, from oceans to fresh water to bare rock to soil. Cyanobacteria produce the compounds responsible for earthy odors we detect in soil and some bodies of water. The greenish slime on the side of your damp flowerpot, the wall of

your house or the trunk of that big tree is more likely to be cyanobacteria than anything else. Cyanobacteria have even been found on the fur of polar bears, to which they impart a greenish tinge. In short, Cyanobacteria have no one habitat because you can find them almost anywhere in the world."

Read more: http://www.lenntech.com/eutrophication-water-bodies/algae.htm#ixzz0tbTb1snN

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"Cyanobacteria: phylum of prokaryotic aguatic bacteria that obtain their energy through photosynthesis. They are often referred to as blue-green algae, even though it is now known that they are not related to any of the other algal groups, which are all eukaryotes. Cyanobacteria may be single-celled or colonial. Depending upon the species and environmental conditions, colonies may form filaments, sheets or even hollow balls. Some filamentous colonies show the ability to differentiate into three different cell types. Despite their name, different species can be red, brown, or yellow; blooms (dense masses on the surface of a body of water) of a red species are said to have given the Red Sea its name. There are two main sorts of pigmentation. Most cyanobacteria contain chlorophyll a, together with various proteins called phycobilins, which give the cells a typical blue-green to grayish-brown colour. A few genera, however, lack phycobilins and have chlorophyll b as well as a, giving them a bright green colour.

Unlike bacteria, which are heterotrophic decomposers of the wastes and bodies of other organisms, cyanobacteria contain the green pigment chlorophyll (as well as other pigments), which traps the energy of sunlight and enables these organisms to carry on photosynthesis. Cyanobacteria are thus autotrophic producers of their own food from simple raw materials. Nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria need only nitrogen and carbon dioxide to live: they are able to fix nitrogen gas, which cannot be absorbed by plants, into ammonia (NH3), nitrites (NO2) or nitrates (NO3), which can be absorbed by plants and converted to protein and nucleic acids.

Cyanobacteria are found in almost every conceivable habitat, from oceans to fresh water to bare rock to soil. Cyanobacteria produce the compounds responsible for earthy odors we detect in soil and some bodies of water. The greenish slime on the side of your damp flowerpot, the wall of

your house or the trunk of that big tree is more likely to be cyanobacteria than anything else. Cyanobacteria have even been found on the fur of polar bears, to which they impart a greenish tinge. In short, Cyanobacteria have no one habitat because you can find them almost anywhere in the world."

Read more: http://www.lenntech....m#ixzz0tbTb1snN

Thanks Will!! Now if I could get passed the first sentence, that would be awesome!! That's the New York Public School systems for ya!! Shoulda stayed in elementary school... :doh:

Just trying to lighten the mood...thanks for the great info!!

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I got rid of mine with phosban and/or a mexican turbo snail. I am actually letting it grow in my tank as we speak(its about a 12"x12" section now) and am planning on adding phosban again this weekend to see if that is what eliminated it as I also added a mexican turbo although now he isnt touching it. Its a little experiment Ive been wanting to try to factor out the turbo as I doubt he ate it.

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