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White spots that look like powdered Sugar ???


CBM5

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I just set up my first SW tank two weeks ago. I have a Diatom break out but I understand it is fairly normal especially at this stage. I have been noticing white spots on my rock the last two days. Has anyone seen this before? Is it anything to worry about?

I used some live rock but primarily base rock. Since the base rock is still mostly white it is hard to make it out in pictures but it's visible on the live rock in pictures.

My Ammonia spike is down from 6.1 to 0.3

Nitrates and Nitrites are both on the downward trend as well

PH is 8.2

Temp is 77 degrees

See pics below

Thanks in advance for any info.

post-2451-0-89384700-1337221805_thumb.jp

post-2451-0-06021700-1337221847_thumb.jp

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It is part of the cycle. Expect more. Not sure what your white spots are, but I have had similiar spots. A bloom of copepods would look like what you have.

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It is part of the cycle. Expect more. Not sure what your white spots are, but I have had similiar spots. A bloom of copepods would look like what you have.

Thats what I read on another forum a lady could not figure it out and it turned out to be copepods. Thanks.

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Maybe sand?wink.png those are my initials-it tripped me out when I saw that for a sec haha

Great initials...sorry for tripping you out....you probably thought you had a white powder problem that you did not even know about smile.png !

Its not sand, looks like powder sugar, there are several spots in the sand bed that are much brighter white than my sand. I think subsea is probably right, I found something similar on another forum.

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If it is copepods, then their movement will be visable to your naked eye. They move slowly. You must slow down and watch patiently to see the movement. It is like hatching brine shrimp eggs. While looking at the eggs floating in the culture water column, all of a sudden it is obvious that they are all wiggling.

Enjoy the progression of your cycle. My 135 G lagoon tank has the same white spots after two months of cycle.

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If they aren't moving, it's probably...

I've got them in all my tanks. The smaller spirals are actually a species of filter feeding ... I guess somebody could argue they are competing with corals/inverts for food but I don't see anyway of compleetly removing them since they can grow in every little nook or cranny. And someone could argue removing them would be a method of nutrient export but I wont go out of my way to do that.

Yes, I've got a ton of spirorbids in my tank, too.

SpirorbidWorms_LionFishLair.jpg

They make my black, back wall look like a starry sky.

Aquarium_RBTAandShrimp_29APR2012.jpg

They even grow on the slower critters smile.png

Aquarium_CerithWithHitchhikers_29APR2012.jpg

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If it is copepods, then their movement will be visable to your naked eye. They move slowly. You must slow down and watch patiently to see the movement. It is like hatching brine shrimp eggs. While looking at the eggs floating in the culture water column, all of a sudden it is obvious that they are all wiggling. Enjoy the progression of your cycle. My 135 G lagoon tank has the same white spots after two months of cycle.

I have stared at it until I am cross eyed....no movement. I think George probably nailed it.

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These guys are a good indicator of a healthy nutriant rich system. They are part of the micro fauna and fana that is introduced with any mature sand/gravel or live rock. Biodiversity is a good thing. Each stage of cycles in the maturing of your system will have a dominant flora or fana.

Hold on for the ride.

La bonne temps roulee,

Patrick

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