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best alternative to super glue


mcallahan

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I've been using the Loctite gel superglue that people often buy to glue frags to rocks, but when I glue the rock that has the frag on it to the rock in my tank, the frag rock keeps falling off.

Does anyone have any suggestions for other adhesives to use to keep my frag-rocks in place?

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I know this part is the most frustrating - rock to rock.

Here's some tips :

IF the rock the frag is on is too heavy in one direction, or top-heavy because of it's shape -- it will eventually fall.

(You may have to reshape it) or consider a different rock for the frag mount itself - like a flat plug).

OR even make your own holes (9 times out of ten - this is what I have to do):

The 2 surfaces where the frag mount and the rock meet both need to be scrubbed with a very rough bristle toothbrush like tool.

If there is still algae on the surface (and there is always algae, heh..)...the glue won't stick.

And they need to have some holes or imperfections for the gel to sink into. (you can "make" some pits by hand in your tanks rock

by using what I call a "finger drill"...This is basically anything with a good grippable handle that you can hold like a fat handled screwdriver

and the end needs to be like a tiny "paddle bit" that when twirlledand pushed (not too hard!) will eat into the aragonite surface.

You may have to use this to drill several pits in a smooth rock in order for the glue to get a good grip on the rock, because after it dries,

aragonite rocks tend to crumble anyways.

You can also insert plastic "pins" into the holes you drill if they are of the right size and depth. (Up to your drilling - by - hand ability).

So - I know this part is difficult - it's almost classifiable as an art form I think after all my fights and bouts with it.

When drilling: just make sure you DONT PUT too much WEIGHT on the driver, and break your bottom glass!.

(Dont' add your entire body weight to it in an attempt to "drill faster") <-- this is the worst mistake I have heard of people doing.

So: take your time and drill the hole(s) slowly. I wish there was such a thing as an "underwater drill" that could be hand held like a battery powered

dremel tool that was completely water tight.. but that thing would probably cost a ton of $$$ it it existed, and every reefkeeper in the world would want one.

I have dreamt of using or converting a battery powered toothbrush to such purpose. - but so far never really tried to do it. ;)

Just take your time - and slowly twirl away with = even a tiny flathead screwdriver will drill holes when twirled over and over in the same spot in aragonite.

You just need good holes for either plastic pins, (I use plastic tubing for bigger holes if they already exist).

Large public aquariums use pvc pipe frames to hold their rocks (which are huge) in place - and they drill great big holes in the rock then run these

pvc pipes through them to make a framework.

So basically - you want to use that same mantra - just downsize everything and think small or even "tiny" as your case may be.

Those plastic toothpicks (white ones) work pretty good in the teeny-tiny cases.

OF course after you test-fit the pins (toothpicks, or pipe) and the rocks and it all looks good in the tank position WITHOUT glue-

(may have to turn off the pumps to keep it from from blowing away) --- the thing "should" sit there.. without holding it. <--- this is a good indication

that now, just reassemble it (this time WITH the glue) and it will probably hold for good once the pumps are on again. :)

Patience and holes and pins == success.

You may have to go to favorite HW store and walk and think and look for you favorite "hand drill" tools.

Some guys use drill bits wrapped with tape (to form a handle).. I like those tiny screwdriver kits they sell for

people who work on electronics myself. (the handle lets you "twirl" the grip part of the

driver without the top of the handle turning at all) Maybe FRY's or some such.

Hey - and BTW - Fry's electronics is a cool place to geek out while looking for cool tools to play around with.

Tie-wraps are another magic tool for aquarium use. and they have those there too.

Good luck!

--Robert

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If you want a drill to use underwater and not to expensive try an old fashioned push drill. It uses your mechanical energy from pushing on the handle to turn the drill bit. Haven't used one since I was around 10 so can't say for sure how much pressure it takes, but I don't think you have to push hard.

I haven't seen one in years, but you can still buy them. $10 on amazon. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0007MX2B0/ref=as...mp;linkCode=asn

I know this part is the most frustrating - rock to rock.

Here's some tips :

IF the rock the frag is on is too heavy in one direction, or top-heavy because of it's shape -- it will eventually fall.

(You may have to reshape it) or consider a different rock for the frag mount itself - like a flat plug).

OR even make your own holes (9 times out of ten - this is what I have to do):

The 2 surfaces where the frag mount and the rock meet both need to be scrubbed with a very rough bristle toothbrush like tool.

If there is still algae on the surface (and there is always algae, heh..)...the glue won't stick.

And they need to have some holes or imperfections for the gel to sink into. (you can "make" some pits by hand in your tanks rock

by using what I call a "finger drill"...This is basically anything with a good grippable handle that you can hold like a fat handled screwdriver

and the end needs to be like a tiny "paddle bit" that when twirlledand pushed (not too hard!) will eat into the aragonite surface.

You may have to use this to drill several pits in a smooth rock in order for the glue to get a good grip on the rock, because after it dries,

aragonite rocks tend to crumble anyways.

You can also insert plastic "pins" into the holes you drill if they are of the right size and depth. (Up to your drilling - by - hand ability).

So - I know this part is difficult - it's almost classifiable as an art form I think after all my fights and bouts with it.

When drilling: just make sure you DONT PUT too much WEIGHT on the driver, and break your bottom glass!.

(Dont' add your entire body weight to it in an attempt to "drill faster") <-- this is the worst mistake I have heard of people doing.

So: take your time and drill the hole(s) slowly. I wish there was such a thing as an "underwater drill" that could be hand held like a battery powered

dremel tool that was completely water tight.. but that thing would probably cost a ton of $$$ it it existed, and every reefkeeper in the world would want one.

I have dreamt of using or converting a battery powered toothbrush to such purpose. - but so far never really tried to do it. :lol:

Just take your time - and slowly twirl away with = even a tiny flathead screwdriver will drill holes when twirled over and over in the same spot in aragonite.

You just need good holes for either plastic pins, (I use plastic tubing for bigger holes if they already exist).

Large public aquariums use pvc pipe frames to hold their rocks (which are huge) in place - and they drill great big holes in the rock then run these

pvc pipes through them to make a framework.

So basically - you want to use that same mantra - just downsize everything and think small or even "tiny" as your case may be.

Those plastic toothpicks (white ones) work pretty good in the teeny-tiny cases.

OF course after you test-fit the pins (toothpicks, or pipe) and the rocks and it all looks good in the tank position WITHOUT glue-

(may have to turn off the pumps to keep it from from blowing away) --- the thing "should" sit there.. without holding it. <--- this is a good indication

that now, just reassemble it (this time WITH the glue) and it will probably hold for good once the pumps are on again. :D

Patience and holes and pins == success.

You may have to go to favorite HW store and walk and think and look for you favorite "hand drill" tools.

Some guys use drill bits wrapped with tape (to form a handle).. I like those tiny screwdriver kits they sell for

people who work on electronics myself. (the handle lets you "twirl" the grip part of the

driver without the top of the handle turning at all) Maybe FRY's or some such.

Hey - and BTW - Fry's electronics is a cool place to geek out while looking for cool tools to play around with.

Tie-wraps are another magic tool for aquarium use. and they have those there too.

Good luck!

--Robert

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Watch the 2 part putty epoxy. That's what I tried using for my first corals. It took a few times to figure out why my skimmer would suddenly go nuts. Then I noticed it was within a minute of placing the epoxy in the water that my skimmer would violently spew forth brown water all over the inside of the tank and on the floor. Super glue for me.

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Watch the 2 part putty epoxy. That's what I tried using for my first corals. It took a few times to figure out why my skimmer would suddenly go nuts. Then I noticed it was within a minute of placing the epoxy in the water that my skimmer would violently spew forth brown water all over the inside of the tank and on the floor. Super glue for me.

I had this same exact problem as well. Plus, I've found you have to use a large amount of the putty to make anything stick. Once I figured out how to super glue correctly (there is a bit of a trick to it, mainly finding a good spot and holding the coral in place for at least 30 seconds), I've had no problems with super glue.

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