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Macro lens


dustint21

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I have a Sony Alpha 300. I want a decent lens FOR FREE!!! LOL! Ok or for a decent price. I dont have a clue what Im looking for. I know they are **** expensive! I heard that Minolta lens will work with the new Sony's. As far as all the numbers and spec I know nothing. What do I need to look for to take good macro shots in a aquarium? The lens I have now came with the camera. Its a 3.5-5.6/18-70. I have been told what the numbers mean in the past, but to be honest I didnt understand. What it all boils down to is I want to when 1 of these dang photo contest! LOL! Some of the best shots I have ever seen came from Princer7! They are just amazing! I know equipment is a huge part of a good photo, but I also know a photo editing program goes along way....

Thanks

Dustin

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The biggest factor in getting a great photo(macro or otherwise) is the computer behind the viewfinder. Then glass, camera, software.

I'm not up to speed on the Sony, but in general a good macro will have a large opening(f/2.8), depending on focal length, and be expensive.

Check out the Tamron/Tokina/Sigma in the 90-100mm range. Great results can be had them and they are relatively cheap used. Shorter ones will produce great results too, but the working distance will be shorter. Not a real problem with corals, but if you get into bugs it might be.

Check Ebay too, that's where I got mine.

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I agree learn everything you can do with your current camera. I have won this contest using a Canon A30 autofocus camera. Knowing your equipment and having an "eye" is very important. Lenses and accesories just help us expand our knowledge.

I have a Nikkor 55mm f2.8 macor lense I bought back in the 80'. I can use it on my new digital if I shoot in manual.

My 2 cents. . .

Dave-

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A quick explanation on what the numbers mean on a lens. The f3.5-5.6 is the largest opening your lens can do at the extremes of the zoom. So in your case at 18mm it would be 3.5 and at 70 it would 5.6. The numbers can be confusing because the higher the number on the focal length, or zoom, the closer you are to the subject. However, with the aperture, or f stop, the lower the number the more wide open the lens is. The better lenses will have a lower possible f stop allowing you to shoot in lower light. This can be very important in aquarium photography since our cameras have a harder time picking up blue light which is what most of our tanks have. So in the case of the Sigma the 105mm is the focal length and it can go as low as f2.8. This is a great lens for macro photography. Just remember the lower the f stop the less you will be able to get in focus. So I try to shoot at the highest f stop I can and still have enough light. That is why a tripod becomes an important tool. It allows you to shoot at a shutter speed lower than 1/60th of a second, which is the slowest speed a human hand can hold still. Anything slower than that and you will get motion blur. I hope I didn't overwhelm you.

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Depends on what you're looking for in a tripod.

If you're just looking for shooting your aquarium you don't need anything fancy. You'll be on a level surface without any wind to affect stability. Pretty much anything is going to do as long as it'll hold the camera.

If you're looking for a "good" tripod, you're looking at more than $100...but I don't have any good recommendations. I've got a cheap tripod. :lol:

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