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mcallahan

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It possibly is a zoanthid eating nudibranch.

Melevsreef Link

O'boy.....I agree w/you. Mark, did you dipped your zoas colonies when you first got them. This little guys can be very illusive, they blend in w/your zoas. Get ready to dip them or use a magnifying glass to see if got anymore.

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O'boy.....I agree w/you. Mark, did you dipped your zoas colonies when you first got them. This little guys can be very illusive, they blend in w/your zoas. Get ready to dip them or use a magnifying glass to see if got anymore.

Well I yanked him from the tank. I yanked the other one I found too.

I can't dip all my zoas as some have grown off the frags and onto the rock. I'll keep an eye out for them at night. My zoa growth seemed to be stunted for a long time and has just recently taken off again so hopefully there aren't too many of those guys.

And I hope my 6 line will help take care of them as well.

Is lugol's iodine the dip of choice?

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well just as I say that, I just spotted two more. Tweezers to the rescue.

Any ill effects on dipping a whole LR?

I would suspect just the loss of any nitrifying bacteria. But could be wrong on the effects of any other corals/inverts on/in the rock.

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Crap, I didn't dip the zoos I got from azcummings yesterday. I probably have some of these too. Anyone know a good predator for these? I have a thick lipped wrasse that loves to go after small things. I was going to move him to that tank anyway.

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Crap, I didn't dip the zoos I got from azcummings yesterday. I probably have some of these too. Anyone know a good predator for these? I have a thick lipped wrasse that loves to go after small things. I was going to move him to that tank anyway.

that frag was small enough that you should be able to check it over and see anything on there. I'd be interested to see what goes after them as well...if anything.

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Sure looks like one - but from your picture I'm not sure it has enough arms. Aren't they usually identified by a cluster of four/five arms just below their head? It will take on the color of your zoas if it is.

Some wrasses (Halichoeres) and some butterfly fish (Chaetodon) will eat 'em up as fast as they breed, but of course, the fishes themselves might pose a problem for your reef. I can look up the specific breeds if you wish.

-Paul

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Sure looks like one - but from your picture I'm not sure it has enough arms. Aren't they usually identified by a cluster of four/five arms just below their head? It will take on the color of your zoas if it is.

Some wrasses (Halichoeres) and some butterfly fish (Chaetodon) will eat 'em up as fast as they breed, but of course, the fishes themselves might pose a problem for your reef. I can look up the specific breeds if you wish.

-Paul

Paul,

That would be awesome if you could. I haven't stocked my tank with fish yet, but one thing I am working into my plan is natural predators of things I don't want in my tank.

Thanks,

John

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Dipping a med/lrg rock, IMO, it won't damage the LR but any little inverts (tiny starfish, copepods, amiphods, the tiniest crustacea will probably die but w/your stable system it should repopulate rather quickly.

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The two that are quoted as having a taste for zoa eating nudibranches are Copperband Butterflys (Chelmon rostratus) and Labroides dimidiatus (a cleaner wrasse.)

The Copperband is notoriously difficult to keep because it is a terribly picky eater. In fact, it's favorite diet might be your zoas!

That particular wrasse (L. dimidiatus) should be avoided, as it is (I think) illegal to collect them, and they have only a limited population on their native reefs. Removing them from the reefs seems to have an derogatory effect on the fish populations all out of proportion to what one might expect.

After looking them up, I am kind of sorry I brought them up at all. Sorry.

-Paul

Paul,

That would be awesome if you could. I haven't stocked my tank with fish yet, but one thing I am working into my plan is natural predators of things I don't want in my tank.

Thanks,

John

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The two that are quoted as having a taste for zoa eating nudibranches are Copperband Butterflys (Chelmon rostratus) and Labroides dimidiatus (a cleaner wrasse.)

The Copperband is notoriously difficult to keep because it is a terribly picky eater. In fact, it's favorite diet might be your zoas!

That particular wrasse (L. dimidiatus) should be avoided, as it is (I think) illegal to collect them, and they have only a limited population on their native reefs. Removing them from the reefs seems to have an derogatory effect on the fish populations all out of proportion to what one might expect.

After looking them up, I am kind of sorry I brought them up at all. Sorry.

-Paul

Paul,

Thanks for letting me know.

The Copperband has been borderline on my list of potential fish because they have been know to eat some pests including apstasia, but also your corals.

The Labroides dimidiatus looks familiar, almost like I have seen him somewhere in person. It's a pretty wrasse, but I wouldn't want to hurt a population.

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Hi, everyone,

I just ran across an article about these guys:

Mark Martin on Dealing with Zoanthid-Eating Nudibranchs

I don't know if it will help, but thought I'd add this link to the discussion...

ej

Thanks for posting the article..... the more info is provided the better the chances of dealing w/pesky problems.

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