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Small Tank Reactor


chippwalters
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This small tank reactor is great for nano tanks under 40 gallons. It moves around 100 gallons an hour through the media bag.

I use it with pre-packaged bags of Chemipure Elite:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BS96U60/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_Q20Z0XT4EXQ1MGPEWZ53?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

but you can use it with any media in a filter bag, including charcoal, gfo and other.

It requires the use of this inexpensive pump, which snaps directly into the side. You can get 2 of them for $18:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07SKGYNYZ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The unit can sit on the bottom of your sump or you can attach it to the wall using these 1.26 inch D x 1/8 inch neodymium disc magnets (always be careful when handling magnets!):

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B089CPXQQG/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

The magnets are enclosed in screw cap containers.

This reactor is super simple to operate and clean. You can easily snap the pump on and off the unit, and there are no holes on the bottom so it won't drip water when your remove it from your sump. Just unscrew the lid to swap out the media bag.

I printed it in PLA using a .4mm nozzle with .2mm layer height. Printed on my MK3S+

Files can be found at: https://www.prusaprinters.org/prints/139031-small-aquarium-tank-reactor

 

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That's a beautiful design Chipp!  I have transitioned to printing tank parts with PETG for durability.  Have you done any investigation about PLA and it's lifetime in saltwater?  How long are your parts lasting?  I know that several strainer feeders and other parts I have printed tend to become algae traps so I was replacing them often.  I've wondered about coating them in epoxy, the print lines seem to provide the surface area that algae loves.

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Hey Mike, Chipp.  Tim and I did some experiments with a waterproof concrete sealant on a PLA part some time ago.  It was a cone for a small LED star.  The part was easy enough to sand and the coating seemed to work well, but not intended to be submerged.  Fine tuning the slicer software to reduce print lines, as well as some light sanding can certainly smooth the surface of prints.  Parts like a strainer would likely add more time to post production if you intended to sand them down.  There are products used by print enthusiasts such as XTC 3D two part resin for masking layer lines and creating a very smooth surface.  I've used it (still have some I think), although I do not know if it is food safe.  It's cost more, but certainly less fumes than fiberglass resin.  I did find a product from Alumilite called Amazing Clear Cast that states it is compliant with FDA 21 CFR 175.300.  Don't know how far of a jump that would be to "aquarium safe". 

Side note, the overflow on my 20 gallon is still going strong.  I believe you printed that one in PLA.  I'll typically use a toothbrush dipped in H2O2 to cut back on any algae growing on top. 

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If I'm remembering correctly yhe overflow Chipp printed when he first strarted printing stuff and has another couple years use on it in addition to how long your system's been running.

 

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Yeah, that was ABS. We'll have to wait and see how it works out.

1 hour ago, Timfish said:

If I'm remembering correctly yhe overflow Chipp printed when he first strarted printing stuff and has another couple years use on it in addition to how long your system's been running.

 

 

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  • 5 months later...
On 2/24/2022 at 8:15 AM, mFrame said:

That's a beautiful design Chipp!  I have transitioned to printing tank parts with PETG for durability.  Have you done any investigation about PLA and it's lifetime in saltwater?  How long are your parts lasting?  I know that several strainer feeders and other parts I have printed tend to become algae traps so I was replacing them often.  I've wondered about coating them in epoxy, the print lines seem to provide the surface area that algae loves.

Hi Mike,

My parts seem to be doing well. I've got a reactor in the sump for close to 10 months now, with no issues. I wash it out every few months, but my sump is cryptic, so there's not much light getting to it for algae to grow.

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