Jump to content

new to ARC form MN


Nathan Explosion

Recommended Posts

So i am new to the ARC and it looks like there are a lot of people here that enjoy what they do! being form MN there are not a lot of places for me to go and look and buy saltwater items. i currently have a 30 gallon tank, 200w heater (remember i am from MN!) a Current 130watt light w/ luner leds, Emperor 280 filter. I also have about 30 lbs of live rock. I have 1 flame angle, 1 blue damsel, and 1 fire fish.

When the last of my fish live their natural lives i plan on changing my tank to a reef tank. does anybody have any pointers on starting out with corals, LPS, SPS, cleaner packs? Just beginner stuff like that so i get a feel for what to do. Anything helps!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the club!

The only fish you have that might pose a problem for corals is the flame angel. I had one that loved the taste of SPS, but I know others who have them with no issues. You could probably get Zoas and have no issues. They are toxic so he should leave them alone. They will also do fine under the lighting you have.

The main thing I would look into is getting a skimmer. That will be much more beneficial to your tank than the Emperor. HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the club - -We are meeting today to see a large system. - You should come to the meeting . It is close to where you live.

(Many of us live a long way out).

A very nice group of people. -Lots of diversity in the group. -Everything from SPS specialists to zoo-lovers to just fish lovers.

A very wide age range too, so there's a lot of different perspectives, but we all get along very well, and I for one enjoy

hearing the experiences of the others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to the club!

The only fish you have that might pose a problem for corals is the flame angel. I had one that loved the taste of SPS, but I know others who have them with no issues. You could probably get Zoas and have no issues. They are toxic so he should leave them alone. They will also do fine under the lighting you have.

The main thing I would look into is getting a skimmer. That will be much more beneficial to your tank than the Emperor. HTH

i do a weekly waterchange of 5 gallons. that usually keeps my water in check, but yes i do want one because i think it will help my cause a bunch, plus added water flow. i am looking into getting some "green flowerpot coral" or some "green star polyp" i just need general advice on corals because i dont know anybody with this hobby. good advice is hard to get up here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i do a weekly waterchange of 5 gallons. that usually keeps my water in check, but yes i do want one because i think it will help my cause a bunch, plus added water flow. i am looking into getting some "green flowerpot coral" or some "green star polyp" i just need general advice on corals because i dont know anybody with this hobby. good advice is hard to get up here.

Hi Nathan,

I'm moving to Austin from Chicago in May, and just stumbled upon this club while looking for the closest saltwater store to my new house. Signed up, and thought I'd give my first piece of advice out, in hope that I may receive advice from this club in the future.

I've been experimenting with reef systems since January, and if I learned anything these past 5 months, it is to completely avoid the 'flowerpot coral' you have mentioned. Otherwise known as goniopora, this species has almost no chance of survival in tanks for extended periods of time. I fell into the trap of seeing one at the local store here, found it beautiful, and did an impulse buy. The first 2 weeks it was indeed beautiful, but after that, day by day, the polyps slowly closed up and started retracting, and I could tell it was dying. I did extensive research on this, and it seems these have a very small chance of living in home aquariums. I now have an ornamental skeleton to remind me to never impulse buy again. Nobody likes killing something beautiful nor supporting the collection of something that has a low chance of surviving.

I've had the best luck with zoanthids, sometimes called zoos or zoas, and these are indeed the easiest to work with for beginners. They are available in unlimited colors and various shapes, will reproduce and spread over time, and look amazing under good lighting. I would also suggest any of the 'leather' corals, such as toadstool or mushrooms, as these will live under moderate lighting and don't require much maintenance.

Green star polyps have been hardy in my experience, however, and I wish you best of luck! Just read up. This club is already impressing me.

-Rob (currently in chilly Indiana)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...