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HarleyGuy

Calcium Reactor and Low PH

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Hi all, my CaRx controlled by Apex is working good but my tank PH is running a bit too low with a low demand. I’m afraid this is going to get a lot worse as I increase demand. By low I mean the 7.5 range in the low end. I don’t have a good option to run an outside line to my skimmer so I was thinking Kalkwasser in the top off water? What are your thoughts on my issue?

thanks 

John 

 

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I wont try to give an ipinion .

My tank ph was 8.2 before and 8.07 after the reactor. It is now 8.4 a year later

Here is some info from reef keeping magazine

Troubleshooting:

Low Tank pH

After adding a calcium reactor, many aquarists complain that the pH of the tank is lower than it was previously. Aquarists often think that excess CO2 in the effluent that has not had time to react with and dissolve the media is the reason for the reduced pH. However, remember that the calcium reactor is adding alkalinity, mainly in the form of bicarbonate, (which itself will depress the tank pH) until excess CO2 is degassed into the atmosphere. Some of the bicarbonate is then converted into carbonate. This is very similar to the effect observed when adding sodium bicarbonate to your tank as a buffer.

In order to rid the tank of any excess CO2 and maintain a good pH, it is essential to have good circulation at the air/water interface.

The pH can also be boosted by using limewater as top-off water. Limewater (also known as kalkwasser) works by using the CO2 in the tank water and the hydroxide ions from the limewater to increase the alkalinity. In turn, removal of the excess CO2 leads to an increase of the tank pH.

Another popular technique to remove excess CO2 is to degas the effluent, either by running it through an additional container of calcium carbonate chippings or by dripping the effluent into a small container housing an air stone. Results from these methods vary, with some aquarists reporting significant increases in alkalinity or pH and others seeing little observable difference (probably due to different calcium reactor designs and their effectiveness). With both of these methods you must be careful. As the pH is driven back up towards natural seawater levels, some of the bicarbonate is converted into carbonate. Once the water becomes supersaturated with carbonate, it will be more inclined to precipitate onto calcium carbonate surfaces, and some alkalinity will be lost.

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4 minutes ago, Dogfish said:

I wont try to give an ipinion .

My tank ph was 8.2 before and 8.07 after the reactor. It is now 8.4 a year later

Here is some info from reef keeping magazine

Troubleshooting:

Low Tank pH

After adding a calcium reactor, many aquarists complain that the pH of the tank is lower than it was previously. Aquarists often think that excess CO2 in the effluent that has not had time to react with and dissolve the media is the reason for the reduced pH. However, remember that the calcium reactor is adding alkalinity, mainly in the form of bicarbonate, (which itself will depress the tank pH) until excess CO2 is degassed into the atmosphere. Some of the bicarbonate is then converted into carbonate. This is very similar to the effect observed when adding sodium bicarbonate to your tank as a buffer.

In order to rid the tank of any excess CO2 and maintain a good pH, it is essential to have good circulation at the air/water interface.

The pH can also be boosted by using limewater as top-off water. Limewater (also known as kalkwasser) works by using the CO2 in the tank water and the hydroxide ions from the limewater to increase the alkalinity. In turn, removal of the excess CO2 leads to an increase of the tank pH.

Another popular technique to remove excess CO2 is to degas the effluent, either by running it through an additional container of calcium carbonate chippings or by dripping the effluent into a small container housing an air stone. Results from these methods vary, with some aquarists reporting significant increases in alkalinity or pH and others seeing little observable difference (probably due to different calcium reactor designs and their effectiveness). With both of these methods you must be careful. As the pH is driven back up towards natural seawater levels, some of the bicarbonate is converted into carbonate. Once the water becomes supersaturated with carbonate, it will be more inclined to precipitate onto calcium carbonate surfaces, and some alkalinity will be lost.

Great Article, thanks!!   I can try the degassing although I don't like using another plug (power). I'm going to change my flow tomorrow by replacing an always on powerhead with a wave-maker pump that I picked up. I'll pay attention to circulation at the top. Kalk in the top off will be a last ditch item. I would like to know if anyone in the club is adding Kalk to a top off with a CaRX and how much they are using per gal of top off water to buffer ph. I would prefer that the CaRX provide most of the Calc/Alk/Magnesium. 

Thanks again!!

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