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When a boil notice is in effect, its a good idea to turn off your RO/DI systems, or your filters will foul much quicker.

https://www.kxan.com/news/local/austin/austin-water-issues-citywide-boil-water-notice/1541215615

Areas affected by boil water notice:

  • Austin
  • Travis County Water District 10
  • Wells Branch MUD
  • North Austin MUD #1
  • Northtown MUD
  • West Travis County PUA
  • Sunset Valley
  • Rollingwood
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You could use it for drinking water. I seriously doubt that boiling will get rid of all the sewage, petroleum products and pesticides that were upstream in the flood. Who knows how much of that they will let thru.

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Although my water company hasn't issued a boil notice I did make sure to order another filter set from BRS this morning and checked my water softner levels.

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6 hours ago, Dogfish said:

You could use it for drinking water. I seriously doubt that boiling will get rid of all the sewage, petroleum products and pesticides that were upstream in the flood. Who knows how much of that they will let thru.

I wouldn't worry too much about the other items you listed. The reason turbidity is a regulatory parameter is that the cloudiness of the water affects how active the chlorine is when it is mixed with the water to remove pathogens. The utility hasn't (to my knowledge) had a pathogen failure yet, they just suspect it might happen due to the reduced chlorine effectiveness. 

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58 minutes ago, victoly said:

I wouldn't worry too much about the other items you listed. The reason turbidity is a regulatory parameter is that the cloudiness of the water affects how active the chlorine is when it is mixed with the water to remove pathogens. The utility hasn't (to my knowledge) had a pathogen failure yet, they just suspect it might happen due to the reduced chlorine effectiveness. 

So I assume the chlorine/chloramine levels in the tap water are going to be higher after all this, right? I wonder how long this will take to all play out. I have just a basic 4 stage rodi, can I expect this to wreck my membrane? Should I be testing for chlorine in the filtered water? Or will it just burn up the di resin faster?

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I don't know for sure, I'm not on the water supply side, but I would suspect that they will increase chlorine as high as they can and not go over limits for chlorine. I haven't heard a timeline. We're probably at the mercy of the river. I just wouldnt make water until this blows over if you can avoid it. 

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sediment filters will be toast.  the will increase chlorine/chloramines in the short term to ensure there are no bacterial blooms.  once things settle down and they clear the silt, things should return to normal.  just keep an eye on your sediment filters, smell check the carbon blocks (if they are overwhelmingly smelling like chlorine, time to change it out).  process water in large batches if you have to.  add "throw away" blocks infront of your system (the kind they sell for "inline fridge water")

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my tap water TDS is 127 today, north round rock/brushy creek north MUD.  so i guess all the austin ppl can beg round rock ppl for top off water for 3-ish weeks :)

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1 hour ago, Isaac said:

my tap water TDS is 127 today, north round rock/brushy creek north MUD.  so i guess all the austin ppl can beg round rock ppl for top off water for 3-ish weeks :)

Braggart!

I'd be curious about the Austin TDS currently compared to normal.

Where I'm at in Georgetown I don't think I've ever seen under 300 TDS going in.

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I just measured 124 on my Austin water, which seems pretty average for me if I recall correctly

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I don't know for sure, I'm not on the water supply side, but I would suspect that they will increase chlorine as high as they can and not go over limits for chlorine. I haven't heard a timeline. We're probably at the mercy of the river. I just wouldnt make water until this blows over if you can avoid it. 

Come on Victoly! You’re our go-to source for COA info and rumors.
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Your TDS would creep up slowly, and thats if you see it increase at all. 

Remember that everything that is coming from the water treatment plants is still treated to a particular TDS standard. Combine that with the fact that there is a delay between the second a drop of treated water goes into the distribution system and when it hits your tap. That delay time has a ton of variables, but it's conceivable that the turnaround time might be a few days from point A to point B.

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23 hours ago, jolt said:

I just measured 124 on my Austin water, which seems pretty average for me if I recall correctly

wow, really?!?  I don't think I've ever seen my "before" TDS higher than 35-40.  Just made a batch of new water last week, and that was directly after swapping out all RODI innards, including membrane, so I'm just going to leave it off for a while and not look to see what it's running currently.

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I have around 10 gallons left in my ATO, then after that, zilch. So, is using my 4-stage RODI system on our current diarrhea water bad? Is that the consensus?

As I type this, my fish are all looking at me like:

098.png 

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My meter typically measures pre-membrane (124), post membrane (4-8), and post DI (0)

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This is pretty interesting. We're a unique group of people who have some citizen science data points!

I would wager that those who have higher TDS are closer to the treatment plants and or their intermediate storage points and thus have "fresher" (or in this case siltier) water. It'd be interesting to plot the points on a map. 

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If I remember correctly, Eddius and I are pretty close to each other, far southwest Austin

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I think Brian lives up north?

Also a terminology thing:

Turbidity = the optical scattering of light due to cloudiness of a sample. This is what we are currently having problems with. 

 

TSS = total suspended solids which is the material able to be physically filtered out


TDS = total dissolved solids which pass through coarse filtering. 

The classic example of how these things differ is to throw a gram of talc chunks vs a gram of talc powder into a liter of water. One will very low turbidity (chunks) and one will have high turbidity (the powder) but both have the same suspended solids. If you had a third container with a gram of table salt in it, your turb would be low, but your TDS would be high.

TL'DR there can be correlation between turbidity and TDS but it requires qualification and is situation specific. 

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I think Brian lives up north?

Also a terminology thing:

Turbidity = the optical scattering of light due to cloudiness of a sample. This is what we are currently having problems with. 
 
TSS = total suspended solids which is the material able to be physically filtered out

TDS = total dissolved solids which pass through coarse filtering. 

The classic example of how these things differ is to throw a gram of talc chunks vs a gram of talc powder into a liter of water. One will very low turbidity (chunks) and one will have high turbidity (the powder) but both have the same suspended solids. If you had a third container with a gram of table salt in it, your turb would be low, but your TDS would be high.

TL'DR there can be correlation between turbidity and TDS but it requires qualification and is situation specific. 
Brian is in Southeast Austin... More East than south.

My brain hurts now... Thanks Ian.

Made 50 gallons last night... Everything ran normally... No extra silt in my 1 micron sediment filter and TDS stayed where it normally was post membrane so assuming same rejection rate, same pre-membrane.

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Keep in mind there are quite a few water utilities in the area.  At least some are using wells which I would think would be unaffected and some of the private utilities are definitely better at filtering their water.    Those who have posted TDS reading it would be helpful to also post the water utilities water source to get some idea of why there's such a wide range of readings.

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