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Timfish

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Timfish last won the day on July 28

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About Timfish

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    North Central
  • Tank Size
    140 gal.
  • Gender
    Male

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  1. For the first time, a species of fish has demonstrated evidence of possible self-awareness by passing the famous mirror test. https://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/a-fish-has-passed-the-benchmark-test-of-selfawareness-is-it-time-to-rethink-their-intelligence/all/ Here's the paper the article referenced. In the abstract the researchers raised interesting questions about how the "mark test" should be interpreted. https://www.biorxiv.org/content/early/2018/08/21/397067
  2. Timfish

    mushroom causing cloudy water - dying?

    Sorry to hear it's gone downhill.
  3. Timfish

    mushroom causing cloudy water - dying?

    +1 for pooping or releasing eggs/sperm. What species/variety is it? What color is the "stuff" coming out it's mouth? is it completely deflated or roughly the same size it's been for the last few days or week? Does it have slimy white or brown patches on it? typically, but not always, when mushrooms die they completly deflate, the mouth relaxes open and it's "guts" can be seen through the open mouth. (Pictures would help 🙂 )
  4. Timfish

    Nitrate .50 Phos.03 Now what? Coral frenzy?

    Yes, corals need phosphate to utilize nitrogen. If corals do not have enough phosphate to utilize nitrogen it causes the coral to start making sulpholipeds instead of phospholipids which makes caoral very sensititve to changes in light intensity and and temperature. It also forces the coral to store the excess nitrogen as uric acids crystals inside the coral cells and as they grow the crystal rupture the cell walls.
  5. Timfish

    Nitrate .50 Phos.03 Now what? Coral frenzy?

    I would keep phospahtes above .03 mg/l. Research* done a closed system over a 10 year period at the University of Southampton shows phosphate deficiency causes serious problems with corals and their simbionts making coral very sensitive to changes in lighting, temperature and increases in nitrogen. * Phosphate deficiency promotes coral bleaching and is reflected by the ultrastructure of symbiotic dinoflagellates https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17301601?via%3Dihub Nitrate enrichment can increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/file/Nutrient enrichment.pdf Ultrastructural Biomarkers in Symbiotic Algae Reflect the Availability of Dissolved Inorganic Nutrients and Particulate Food to the Reef Coral Holobiont https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2015.00103/full
  6. Timfish

    Upgrade to 90

    You can still do an internal overflow box. You'll have to have the bulkead fitting on the back side but you can have a full height internal box with the bulkhead fitting just above the bottom. You can locate the overflow at the top with either a shallow overflow box on the inside or some type of intake screen and a box on the outside that has a drain or you can have plumbing go directly from the bulkhead fitting to your sump.
  7. Timfish

    Some filamentous cryptic sponge???

    That would be a good guess. What's the scale? (From the calcerous worm tube it looks to me like they are less than 1/2", is that corrrect?) They could be also be one of the Foraminifera.
  8. Timfish

    AC out - lucky me

    Great to hear your AC is working again! I always keep a window AC unit around for backup in case of an AC failure. Fans and ice or a chiller work great short term. But I've known it to take as long as a week to get a central AC compressor replaced. Using fans and ice for several days can make a room uncomfortably humid and the longer the AC is out the greater the effort needed as the house heats up and a chiller is in a room is essentially a space heater.
  9. Timfish

    AC out - lucky me

    Nice emergency chiller! Your tank should be fine. (Got no clue about your daughter but my baby sister was pretty clueless and she turned out ok. ) I don't typically see issues until the temp gets up around 86° - 88°. One warning sign though is if your fish start breathing hard. In case you haven't already thought of this leaving the lights and any uneccessary equipment off will help keep temps down. I don't know how much a fan would help in this situation, it'll cool the tank initially but as humidity climbs in the room the cooling effect from the fan will drop and the increased humidity might actually exacerbate the problem.
  10. Timfish

    Back in the hobby 42 Hex build

    In case you didn't see the announcement Austin Aquadome and River City have PAR meters for rent. Initially I would set the output so you get roughly 80 PAR on the sand directly under your fixture. The blue channel(s) initially should not be more than 10% brighter than the white channel. You cold also write down readings for each channel at 10%, 20%, 30%, etc, for future refference. Adding the output from each channel will give you total PAR. Also, keep in mind corals have to adjust thier photobiology whenever light levels and environmental parameters change and it will take weeks to months and thier color may change significantly depending on each corals genetics and experiences. your best success will be to macth corals to the light levels you've selected. Avoid moving corals around too frequently and keep in mind if you initially drop light levels to acclimate a frag you are forcing all your corals to shift their photobiology.
  11. Timfish

    Back in the hobby 42 Hex build

    There are good cheap led fixtures but there are some pretty bad ones too. A big problem I see with cheap "black box" or cheap light bars like the PopularGrow found on Ebay is they are marketed using the max wattage of the LEDs used not the actual wattage which is always significantly less. Even so there are still a few very good fixtures that might work for you. An additional issue I've found across the board with all LED fixtures, not just cheap "black box" brands is polycarbonate lenses either hold heat around the LED burning their silicone seal/lens or the polycarbonate burns itself from UV and blue lenses, Kessels being the only exception I've found using a glass lens. (While much better than MH or T5s from what I've seen Kessils have about a 10% failure rate around 3 years.) The other weak link I've seen with LED fixtures, and this include my own DIY fixtures, are fan failures but in most cases they are not very difficult to replace for the moderately experienced DIYer or mechanicly inclined. Fixtures that have a pretty good rep that should work for you are the Ocean Revive 247 and the "black box" MarsAqua, ViperSpectra and Evergrow. Their diamensions should allow them to fit inside a canopy for your 45 hex but you need to double check that and my guess is you'll probably need to add an additional fan to the canopy to help ventilate it if you're using one. These fixture are able to put out a lot more light than you'll need for any corals in your tank so you'll need to borrow a PAR meter to make sure you don't fry everything. If you're not adverse to DIY I have a couple DIY pdf files listed on this thread There's also a chart with PAR readings with different lenses so you can calculate an approximate intensity at the depth you need.
  12. Timfish

    Bio pellet reactor

    Ty left out carbon dosing also reduces phosphates#. It was with corals maintained for years with carbon dosing the researchers at Southampton* discovered how phosphate deficiency screws up the coral/zooxantheallae symbiosis. You can get corals to display very nice colors by carefully manipulating the phosphate/nitrate ratios. Doing so, however, can make them very sensitive to changes in temperature and lighting levels. And as a significant part of a corals immune system is derived from their zooxanthellae, tightly controlling phosphates and nitrates to restrict zooxanthellae also runs the risk of compromising a corals ability to deal with new microbe strains from another system. # Assuming it is actually bacteria that are being grown. If it's cryptic sponges they are putting phospholipids back in the water column and nitrogen rich detritus back in the food chain. * Nutrient enrichment can increase the susceptibility of reef corals to bleaching http://www.indiaenvironmentportal.org.in/files/file/Nutrient enrichment.pdf Ultrastructural Biomarkers in Symbiotic Algae Reflect the Availability of Dissolved Inorganic Nutrients and Particulate Food to the Reef Coral Holobiont https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fmars.2015.00103/full Phosphate deficiency promotes coral bleaching and is reflected by the ultrastructure of symbiotic dinoflagellates https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17301601?via%3Dihub
  13. Timfish

    Back in Action

    Time flies when you're having fun! A reef tank can be a great way to develop a kid's intrest in science!
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