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Calculating stocking level?

(i think my blog might turn into a reference section more than a blog.. go w/ it) On this trhead, a really good question came up: This got me thinking about it a bit more.  Over the years I've found the below "equation" to work pretty good for me: 1" of livestock (fish, coral, inverts, anything living) per 1gal actual system water. There are special situations where the 1" is too small (aggressive fish, or fish that need more space.. just add an inch or two.  Also, you should calculate on known max size of your livestock, not current). coraline counts too! (i add it all up and divide by 2).   This also assumes the old addage lbs liverock/sand to working gals.   I know I know, too "engineer-ish,"  but think about it... 230 system gals.  add up all your coral (yes, gsp counts), then add up your fish, shrimp, snails, crabs.   In "skimmer land" : 115"(50%) to 188"(75%),this is a "light load."   188"(75%) -  230"(100%) this is average 230"(100%) - 375"(150%) this is average-high range 375"+(150%) heavy load.  This also gives you a calculated "capacity" percentage, if you need it. obviously... i'll  update this as time goes on and w/ some feedback!

Isaac

Isaac

 

Things are good!

Things seem to be going my way as of late in my new found aquaria hobby.  I've been able to keep my water levels good in the tank and everything seems to be prospering and on top of that I've been finding some good deals on some sweet corals through checking up my LFS and by making friends via these forums. Just tonight I was able to score a sweet green zoa, which I have dubbed the greene geek zoa after a close friend of mine, as well as a pretty amazing Jedi Mind Trick monti frag from someone I met on the forums.  I also had a friend of mine, who has been doing aquariums for quite a while, take a look over my tank and he said everything was looking top notch! It's just super fulfilling to see something I've been putting quite a bit of work in over the last month or so yielding such good results. That being said, I know my luck can't last forever and eventually something nuts will happen in my tank, but that's just how it goes and I'm prepared for the downs as much as I am the ups.  Tonight I also finally got around to paying my dues to become a premium member, as I'm super interested to hear what Jake and Co have to say at the upcoming Q1 meetings. I've gotten to know Jake and his crew fairly well over the last month and a half or so as they are my LFS and I'm always in there looking at stuff and asking questions. So that's it for right now, I hope to see some of you and make some new friends at the Q1 Meeting! Had to share pics of my new corals from tonight!!!!

z4ck38

z4ck38

 

What is Old is Old and What is New is New

I was chronicling my salty exploits over on the forum thread located here: http://www.austinreefclub.com/topic/38061-zackerys-nano-reef-aquarium/ It turns out that a thread like that doesn't work to the purposes I was trying to achieve, such as having posts remained editable and listed the things I wanted. So in that regards I am moving that to this blog. For those of you who fancy yourselves hip, everything posted here will also be syndicated to http://zackerytaylorswift.tumbler.com. That site features picture and other things in regard to my aquarium, so I feel like that will be your number one source on the elusive aquarium aficionado Zackery Taylor-Swift.  Oh PS: I'm working on building a frag tank in which to cultivate some rare and awesome corals to sell to the community. I don't have much yet, but as my stock grows, I will be paying dues on here and begin to start listing my stock. I promise I will sell some of the hawtest corals you've ever seen. More on that later!

z4ck38

z4ck38

 

226g Peninsula Tank Upgrade (current tank)

Sept 13, 2012 I've had my 90g tank for just over 3 years. Though I've loved it, and loved having it set up as a peninsula tank between my living room and breakfast nook, there have been some things I haven't liked about it. I custom built the stand for it and always expected to have a matching 2' wide X 7' tall accessory cabinet to go along with the tank to hold all my reefing equipment/tools/controllers/etc. So we left a 2' gap between the tank and the wall. Focus on the tank took priority over woodworking, and then a family heirloom 2' butcher block table ended up filling that gap. It's constantly cluttered with reef equipment, food, wires, and salt overspray. I credit the abuse the table is taking with my wife okaying me to upgrade the 90g to my new 226g, as long as "we can rescue the butcher block and not have a gap between the tank and the wall" she said. That gave me plenty of room to play. So our new story begins... I was able to pick up a great custom aquarium stand from a member here. It's solid oak, 7' x 2' x 36" tall. - read the original post 226g Build Thread

mFrame

mFrame

 

Moving On Up - first upgrade to 90g

Nov 5, 2009 (copied from our original entries at http://livingroomreef.blogspot.com/) So with my habit firmly in check, I convinced Laura that we needed a bigger aquarium and that it would be the perfect opportunity to finish the aquarium stand that I started building almost six years ago. In my last house I had a 29g freshwater aquarium much like our current setup but had decided to upgrade it to a 75g tank. Live got in the way, though, and after cutting out most of the pieces for the new stand I ended up shelving all the pieces without assembling them. Apartment life and fish aquariums don't make good partners so the pieces languished away in three garages before finally seeing the light of day again this past June. Ah, the clash of hobbies. If I'd know when we bought are new larger aqaurium that it would take me almost five months to finish the stand I probably would have just bought one at the same time. Instead, I'm now happy to unveil our new 100% Michael Frame, hand-made, cherry and oak aquarium stand.

mFrame

mFrame

 

It begins - our first marine tank (29g)

April 23, 2009 (copied from our original entries at http://livingroomreef.blogspot.com/) After diving the Great Barrier Reef on our honeymoon last month, we've decided to get back into aquariums. Stephen is handling the tropical fish side and beginning his experiment with breeding Blue Rams. Meanwhile we've been working on setting up a 29g (30x12x18) reef aquarium in our living room. We got a great deal on it used from craigslist, and it came with a stand and Emperor 400 filter. So far we have painted the back blue (outside of course), installed a Tunze powerhead, and added 15 lbs of live sand and 15 lbs of live rock. We hope to add more rock this weekend to the tank and some rubble into the Emperor (it's acting as our fuge). After allowing the aquarium to cycle, next on the list is lighting, a battery backup to deal with power outages, and introducing our cleaning crew.  Follow along as we try to establish our own little section of the great reefs of the world. 

mFrame

mFrame

 

Where it started

Like many of us I had my first aquarium as a kid.  Fish from Walmart or local fish stores were the norm, but usually fell away due to neglect.  I got back in the hobby around 1998 running an African cichlid tank.  That lasted for about four years, and I miss the days of hitting all the fish stores in Austin to pick up new fish and exotic plecos (one of my favorites).  I was always too nervous about running marine tanks due to the perceived complexity.   That all changed several years later when I dated a woman who was running two small saltwater tanks in her apartment. I saw the tanks and loved them.  Conversations with her, and a subsequent MAAST meeting held in South Austin that we attended together, convinced me to give it a go.  I bought a 6g eclipse and was sure I would run it as saltwater.  Uncontrolled temps lead to failure, but I now wasn't intimidated to try again. Jump ahead to 2009.  I had gotten married in 2008, and we went to New Zealand and Australia on our honeymoon the following Spring. We scuba dove for the first time on the Great Barrier reef, and I knew when we got back that I had to have a piece of the reef at home.  My wife agreed, and we bought a 29g tank that occupied one corner of our living room.  I spent every night up to my elbows in the tank, moving things, adding corals, and generally disturbing everything.   The little tank quickly became crowded, and I think within about 6 months we planned the upgrade to our 90g tank.  The obsession grew, and in the meantime I took over running the Austin Reef Club.  As I met more members and saw more tanks I felt an upgrade was in order.  I convinced my wife that if she let me upgrade the big tank that I would get rid of several smaller ones around the house.  She agreed, and we ordered the 230. In the next few posts I'll replay the various tanks I had to get me up to the current day, and hopefully I'll keep this maintained from this point on.  Hope you enjoy the ride (and learn from some of the various mistakes I've made).

mFrame

mFrame

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